Photographing Couples

Since Valentine’s day is just around the corner, our photography tips this time will show you how you can avoid taking pictures of couples, such as husbands and wives, brothers and sisters and best friends standing awkwardly side by side in the middle of the frame staring blankly at the camera with no interaction, no intimacy and no interest.

Shooting Couples Tips

Before you can give them some direction, it’s better to see what relationship between them and what kind of people they are.

Lovers and spouses will tend to express their intimacy in a different way from family members and friends. However, whatever the relationship, you, as a photographer need to get them close enough so that their bodies are in contact. This will create nice and tight compositition. Avoid having two people standing either side of the picture with acres of background between them. You might want to get them to turn in slightly and point their feet towards the camera, rather than straight ahead.

Some couples will need no coaxing, and the will naturally play up for the camera. If the’re fooling around and having a good time, now what u need to do is watch carefully what’s going on and capture the mayhem when it reaches its peak – taking an almost candid approach.
Others may need encouragement, and may feel awkward at the start. But eventually they will get over their initial resistance, becoming relax and get into it.

Shooting Couples Tips

Photographing couples when they’re doing things together, even if it’s just having a chat, is a great way to capture them without feeling of self-consciousness. You can use your telephoto lens (eg. 70-200mm) with fast aperture (f/2.8) setting which will enable you to fill the whole frame and helps to seperate them from the background (bokeh), and to get more interesting result, try to place your subject not in the middle of the frame. Use the rule of thirds.

When it comes to lighting couples, you have to be carefull that one person doesn’t cast a shadow on the other. Afternoon/Morning light always gives better result than daylight or flash. If you need to use flash, try to stand two or three metres back, so the flash is not too harsh. Or, you can always use tissue to cover your flash.

Written by Tom –

See also: Photography Tips

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1 Comment »

Comment by kamran farooqui
2006-02-08 06:33:44

dear sir, howr u … i like very well that web side … would u like to give me that
some tips. I want to be a good Photographer .


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