Kodak Easyshare V570

Last Update: Review by PCWorld (added on 20.03.07)

Kodak hasreleased the new Kodak Easyshare V570, a world’s first dual-lens digital camera with two ccd’s. The first lens will do a job as prime 23mm equiv field of view, while the second lens is a 37-117mm three times optical zoom. Both lens systems are mated to a 5 MP CCD sensor. The camera also has 2.5-inch, high resolution LCD screen, with in-camera distortion correction to compensate for ultra-wide angle fish-eye effects that can be turned on or off.

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Kodak V570

Kodak EasyShare V570 Latest Price

>> REVIEWS (last updated: 20.03.07) | back to top

PCWorld reviewed the Kodak EasyShare V570 (rating: 72/100) and wrote:
“The camera’s 2.5-inch LCD screen, which dominates the back, is clear and bright; with its 230,000 pixels, images look sharp. The camera’s controls reside around the screen, and are generally easily accessible. While most other cameras use a left-right control for zooming, the V570 uses an up-down control, which works well. It allows you to keep your thumb firmly on the camera for a tight grip–a good thing, since there is no grip on the front for your fingers. The smooth surface on the front and sides can mean a loose grip if your hands are damp. “

TechTree reviewed the Kodak EasyShare V570 where they rated the camera 3.5/5 and wrote:
“Image-quality-wise, we felt that images from the V570 showed excellent color, but were softer than we’d normally expect from a 5-megapixel digital camera. The skin tones were reproduced beautifully as well. The Auto white balance handles a wide range of lighting comfortably. Practically speaking, the V570 works best with 3-4 MP resolution as it noise-suppression algorithms make the fine details in the image murky, particularly when the contrast levels of that detail are low. Although, all digital cameras carry this flaw, it was more prominent in the V570. “

ThinkCamera reviewed the Kodak EasyShare V570 and wrote:
“Again the Kodak gives good solid results rather than outstanding ones. Image quality is certainly acceptable but from the quality feel of the camera I was hoping for something more.Chromatic aberration (aka “purple fringing”) seems well under control. As you’d expect, the super wide lens is more prone to this than the zoom but unless you go looking for it and provoking it by shooting high contrast edges you shouldn’t have any problems. “

Megapixel reviewed the Kodak EasyShare V570 and wrote:
PROS: Acceptable image quality outdoors and with good light, Dual lens concept interesting, Very compact camera with a good ergonomic design, 2.5-inch, high-res LCD monitor, Easy to use, Solidly built. CONS: 23 mm lens a bit too soft focus, Compression too strong, No compression choices, Flash underpowered, Sensitive to noise, LCD screen hard to see outdoors. “

Let’sGoDigital reviewed the Kodak EasyShare V570 and wrote:
“The impression that the Kodak EasyShare V570 leaves behind after the tests is one of mixed feelings. The dual-lens system offers indisputable advantages, not to mention the fact that this type of wide-angle packaged in a compact digital camera is absolutely unique. However, it remains a pity that the image quality ranges only from average to good, and that we see rivalling 5 Megapixel digital cameras produce better results. Overall, the images are not as sharp as one would expect, which greatly affects the fine details in the image. Granted, the results do improve after applying a little extra sharpness to the image, but this is in fact a process that should already have taken place inside the camera. “

PhotographyBlog reviewed the Kodak EasyShare V570 and wrote:
“The Kodak Easyshare V570 produced images of average quality during the review period. .. the Kodak Easyshare V570 dealt well with chromatic aberrations, with limited purple fringing effects appearing only in high contrast situations. Macro performance is average, allowing you to focus as close as 5 cms away from the subject. The built-in flash worked adequately indoors, with little red-eye and slight under-exposure.The 1/2.5 inch, 5 megapixel sensor used in the Kodak Easyshare V570 produced noisy images at the slowest ISO speeds of 64 and 100, and noisier and blurred images at ISO 200 and 400.”

DigicamReview reviewed the Kodak EasyShare V570 and wrote:
“Image quality seemed to be much better outdoors, where images had low noise and high saturation, but indoors images had much higher and noticeable noise. Images were generally quite soft straight from the camera, especially using the ultra-wide angle lens, and could benefit from sharpening. Purple fringing was average, more noticeable with the ultra-wide angle lens, and red-eye was higher than average. The camera did a good job focusing the majority of the time, but struggled indoors, even with the focus assist lamp. The flash also caused some problems, mainly when using the ultra-wide angle lens, as the camera will tell you it’s in focus, even when it’s not. I did not notice vignetting in photos, however I did notice quite strong barrel distortion using the ultra wide angle lens (more when distortion compensation was off) and there was some pincushion distortion using the full zoom. The macro mode produced good macro photos.”

HardwareZone reviewed the Kodak EasyShare V570 and wrote:
“Nevertheless, for its diminutive dimensions, multiple scene modes, dual-lens and all-round decent performance, the Kodak EASYSHARE V570 is an attractive portable imaging package, even though it is using a smaller pair of 5.0-megapixel CCD image sensors rather than the newer 8-megapixel variants. Remember, Megapixel count isn’t everything and there’s more to it than just numbers, just like how Megahertz is to modern CPUs.”

Photoxels reviewed the Kodak EasyShare V570 and wrote:
“We find the overall image quality of the Kodak V570 to be good to very good with low noise at ISO 64, but we would have preferred images to retain more details. The Kodak V570 produces images that are rich in colours straight out of the camera. More advanced photographers might object to the high colour saturation.The Kodak EasyShare V570 Dual Lens is a one-of-a-kind digital camera that gives well exposed, good to very good quality images straight out of the camera. Its ultra-wide angle lens should be a major selling point for many who desire or require that wide coverage. It is very easy to use and, paired with the optional Printer Dock Plus Series 3 printer, you have One-Touch facility in transferring images to your PC and printing 4×6 in. prints in the convenience of your home.”

PCWorld reviewed the Kodak EasyShare V570 and wrote:
“The camera’s 2.5-inch LCD screen, which dominates the back, is clear and bright; with its 230,000 pixels, images look sharp. The camera’s controls reside around the screen, and are generally easily accessible. While most other cameras use a left-right control for zooming, the V570 uses an up-down control, which works well. It allows you to keep your thumb firmly on the camera for a tight grip–a good thing, since there is no grip on the front for your fingers.”

PopPhoto reviewed the Kodak EasyShare V570 and wrote:
“In our lab tests, the V570 fared well. Despite the fact that its color space is limited to sRGB, the camera scored an Extremely High rating (Avg. Delta E: 9.37) in our color accuracy test. In resolution, it achieved a Very High rating. And, like most compacts, noise was its worst attribute. While noise was Very Low at ISO 64, it jumped to Low at ISO 100, Moderate at ISO 200, and was Unacceptable at ISO 400. The V570 has an ISO boost mode that lets you shoot at ISO 800, but reduces the pixel resolution to 1.3MP. At ISO 800, the V570 scored an Unacceptable rating.”

Steve Digicams reviewed the Kodak EasyShare V570 and wrote:
“I was happy with the V570′s image quality. Outdoor shots were consistently well-exposed and richly saturated, and auto white balance reproduced colors accurately. The V570′s images were essentially noise free at sensitivity settings of ISO 64 and 100. At ISO 200, noise is present in shadow areas, and at ISO 400 noise is evident throughout the image. A sensitivity setting of ISO 800 is also available, although image resolution is limited to 1.8-megapixels and the noise level is fairly high; none the less, ISO 800 will produce usable images when shooting conditions require it. “

DigitalCameraReview reviewed the Kodak EasyShare V570 and wrote:
“Pros: Nicely designed, good looking camera, Ultra-wide angle is effective, a great item for a point and shoot, Excellent battery life, Easy way to adjust exposure compensation
Cons: LCD is too grainy, hard to determine image quality until on your computer, Zoom and auto focus mechanisms are audible on video, Indoor flash images too noisy, Shutter lag a tad longer than other cameras in its class”

David D. Busch has posted his review on Kodak EasyShare V570 and writes:
“The 3X zoom lens offered about the same image quality you’d expect from a run-of-the-mill 5-megapixel camera, while the fixed-focal-length lens performed about the same, except with that impressive ultrawide view. Both lenses suffered from purple fringing and a touch of blooming. While the 23mm lens’s optional barrel-distortion correction did a good job, its faux zoom function provided too much of a quality penalty to be used seriously; we quickly switched digital zoom off completely.However, we liked the colors this camera produced. Blues and reds were fully saturated and brilliant, and flesh tones had only a slight reddish cast. The camera’s red-eye-prevention preflash eliminated most–but not all–of the red glow in human pupils. “

Shawn Barnett & Dave Etchells reviewed the new Kodak Easyshare V570 and wrote:
“Image quality-wise, we felt that images from the V570 showed excellent color, but were softer than we’d normally expect from a 5-megapixel digital camera. – We think that its practical resolution (that is, what you actually see in prints) is closer to that of a three or four megapixel model than a five megapixel one. Its noise-suppression algorithms are also prone to obscuring fine detail, particularly when the contrast levels of that detail are low. All digital cameras do this to some degree, but we felt that we noticed it more in the V570′s shots than we’re accustomed to.”

Kodak EasyShare V570 Latest Price

>> SAMPLE IMAGES (last updated: 02.11.06) | back to top

- Kodak EasyShare V570 Sample image gallery @ TechTree
- Kodak EasyShare V570 Sample image gallery @ Megapixel
- Kodak EasyShare V570 Sample image gallery @ PhotographyBlog
- Kodak EasyShare V570 Sample image gallery @ Steve’s Digicams

>> USER MANUAL

- Download Kodak Easyshare V570 User Manual

>> PRESS RELEASE | back to top

Kodak Unveils World’s First Dual-Lens Digital Camera; Combines Ultra-Wide Angle and Zoom Lenses in Compact Body

Kicking off this week’s 2006 International Consumer Electronics Show (CES), Eastman Kodak Company today introduced the world’s first dual-lens digital still camera, the KODAK EASYSHARE V570 zoom digital camera. Using proprietary KODAK RETINA Dual Lens technology, the elegant V570 camera wraps an ultra-wide angle lens (23 mm) and an optical zoom lens (39 – 117 mm) into a small, sleek package less than an inch thin.

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