Canon Pixma iP8500 VS Epson Stylus Photo R800 VS HP Photosmart 8250

Canon Pixma iP8500

Canon Pixma iP8500

The PIXMA™ iP8500 Photo Printer features the Canon 8-color ChromaPLUS ink system for richer, more true-to-life color reproduction that will satisfy even the most demanding photographer. Its addition of red and green ink tanks expands the color spectrum to a level achieved only by professional printers and the difference is vividly clear. Plus, Canon Full-photolithography Inkjet Nozzle Engineering (FINE) uses a high-performance print head with an amazing 6,144 nozzles, ejecting precise, consistent droplets as small as 2 picoliters. The result? Richer images with improved brilliancy rivaling that of positive film. Your images will come to life as never before.


Reviews

Photo-i.co.uk reviewed the Canon Pixma iP8500 photo printer and wrote:

“Given that creating a new profile is not a major problem and I am sure a new one will follow very shortly, then yes I would buy it. Using Photoshop I have managed to correct the colours to suit my taste, however, some may like the bolder colours out of the box. The ip8500 features and image quality makes this printer stand out from the competition.

Pros:Excellent photographic print quality,Lots of useful features,Speed,Separate ink tanks,Compact design. Cons: The PictBridge port can’t be used to transfer images to a computer
Colour needs to be sorted out,Black plastic case that reminds me of a cats coffin.”

Steve Digicams reviewed the Canon Pixma iP8500 photo printer and wrote:

” The printing quality is on par with Canon’s top of the line i9900 because it uses exactly the same Canon print head and ink tanks. As we saw with the i9900, the iP8500′s prints show a visibly wider color gamut than those printed with the 6- or 5-color photo printers. Noticeably more vibrant are the reds and greens and the ability to reproduce varying shades of orange that prove difficult to impossible on other inkjet printers.

The 8-color ink system yields awesome looking prints and the super-wide print head makes this the fastest letter-size inkjet photo printer on the market. Just remember that this printer uses 8 ink tanks and these ink tanks and the cost of special photo paper can certainly add up in the long run. “

CNET reviewed the Canon Pixma iP8500 photo printer and wrote:

” Easy duplex printing, excellent performance, an extended color gamut, flexible paper handling, and an affordable price make the Canon Pixma iP8500 a versatile performer for a broad range of graphics-printing tasks. With its eight-color ink set–it uses the same consumables as the medium-format i9900–the iP8500 brings the flexibility and the quality of its bigger sibling to those who want the same excellent print quality but don’t need the ability to handle larger paper. “

Check the latest price on Canon Pixma iP8500

Epson Stylus Photo R800

Epson R800 Epson R800


The Epson Stylus Photo R800 offers groundbreaking quality and performance, for perfect prints made to last. With Epson Software™ Film Factory™, Epson Print CD™ software, and premium ICC Profiles, all included in the box, this affordable ink jet offers a complete photographic solution for many creative projects. Whisper-quiet operation and fast built-in connectivity make it an ideal fit for any home or studio, while high-speed performance makes it the perfect printer for quickly creating show-stopping high-gloss prints.

Reviews

Photo-i.co.uk reviewed the EPSON Stylus Photo R800 photo printer and wrote:

“Colours on the R800 are nothing short of superb. I have never had a better quality from the photo-i test print, skin tones are more lifelike than anything I have seen before and I have seen allot of printers over the years. The Gloss Optimizer gives a good gloss finish to glossy media, a feature every 2100 owner will be enviable off. I am assured by Epson that the Gloss Optimizer has the same long life characteristics as the inks. Although I have expressed a slight disappointment with the R800′s ability to produce neutral monochrome prints, it is still very good, but not as neutral as the HP 7960 or SP2100 with Light black. I personally don’t mind a slight warm tone in b/w prints, I have spent a fortune over the years on Selenium toner.

Printing times are slightly slower than those on the Canon printers, but still very respectable – approx. 2.min 20 sec for an A4 print using USB 2.0. These times do not include spooling time, on my set up you can add an extra 15 seconds”

PhotographyBlog reviewed the EPSON Stylus Photo R800 photo printer and wrote:

“The Epson Stylus Photo R800 is the perfect photo printer. Well, almost. It quickly and easily produces stunning prints that are the match of any traditional photo lab, which will last in excess of 80 years when displayed correctly behind glass. It also completely solves the “bronzing” issue that affects the Epson 2100, allowing you to make gloss, semigloss and matte prints without any signs of this issue. In short, if you want to make any kind of archival quality print, including gloss, in the comfort of your own home, then the Epson Stylus Photo R800 is a must-buy.”

Steve Digicams reviewed the EPSON Stylus Photo R800 photo printer and wrote:

“The Stylus Photo R800 is an excellent choice for those searching for the “one printer that can do it all” plus it offers archival printing of gloss and matte media and prints outstanding color and B&W prints. It can handle ordinary text and graphics printing tasks and do it very quickly. And as an extra bonus it can label the CD and DVD discs that you create (if you use inkjet printable discs.) It’s a very fast text printer and a fast photo printer. The individual ink cartridges are less expensive to replace than the single multi-color cartridges but be warned that these printers aren’t cheap to operate. Epson is happy to sell you ink cartridges whenever you need them, at the cost of about $14 each. The 1.5-picoliter sized ink droplets (currently the world’s smallest) make photos that are nearly indistinguishable from conventional photographs and with the new UltraChrome Hi-Gloss pigment inks they can last just as long (Epson claims 80-100 years depending on media used.) “

CNET reviewed the EPSON Stylus Photo R800 photo printer and wrote:

“The good:Excellent print quality; relatively fast photo printing; flexible printer driver; no need to swap Matte Black and Photo Black cartridges. The bad:Doesn’t handle changes in output resolution gracefully; no PictBridge support.The bottom line:This excellent printer cedes its Editors’ Choice crown to the Canon iP8500 but remains a great choice for photo enthusiasts despite some finicky printhead behavior.”

Macworld reviewed the EPSON Stylus Photo R800 photo printer and wrote:

“Test prints made at the maximum resolution (5,760 by 1,440 dpi) revealed almost no dot pattern even when viewed with a 10x loupe. Test prints made on the R800 were brighter and more saturated than prints from the Stylus Photo 2200, and the gray-scale reproduction was neutral. This excellent output was easy to achieve; with Epson paper and profiles, my first test print was perfect.

The Epson Stylus Photo R800 could be the only photo printer you’ll ever need. It’s fast and quiet and produces beautiful, dot-free prints. It even prints on recordable CDs and DVDs. I wish they made a large-format model.”

Check the latest price on Epson Stylus Photo R800

HP Photosmart 8250

HP Photosmart 8250            HP Photosmart 8250

The HP Photosmart 8250 Photo Printer is the world’s fastest photo printer and the ultimate personal home printer for beautiful photos and crisp text at blazing speeds. Its six individual ink cartridges are designed to save ink and money – ideal for highvolume home printing.

Reviews

Wilson Rothman from Time Online Magazine chose the HP Photosmart 8250 as gadget of the week and wrote:

” You get fast, smudge-free images that, generally speaking, pass the picture-quality test. What more could you ask for? How about built in red-eye removal? Print from a memory card and any shot with red-eye will be fixed on the fly. It really works. HP also boasts some other internal technologies. One is SmartFocus, which sharpens up duller images; another is Adaptive Lighting. A hallmark of HP’s imaging products, this mainly lightens faces that have been darkened by light flooding in from behind. Some people call that a “fill flash.”..”

Marc Frochtzweig from DCResource reviewed the HP Photosmart 8250 and wrote:

“We were impressed with the 8250′s simplicity and ease of use, making it a perfect photo printer for newbies to digital photography. You can print directly from memory card or a camera (using PictBridge) – and its LCD screen lets you adjust images without the aid a computer. If you want to use your computer, you can do that too, of course. The new paper tray system is handy, though the top cover doesn’t like to stay on. The Auto Sense technology detects what kind of paper is inserted, and if it’s put in the wrong way, the printer will tell you. Another intelligent feature on the 8250 is how the printer warns you if there’s not enough ink to print your photo.”

Debbie Davies from Pocket-Lint reviewed the HP Photosmart 8250 and wrote:

“All in all, this is a very good home printer with the advantage of being versatile, quick and economical. There are a few drawbacks. This is HP’s first fast printer with new printhead technology. As with all firsts, we encountered some glitches in the software that later models will no doubt rectify. It may be worth waiting a few months for HP to introduce even faster models before deciding which printer to buy. Additionally for a device designed for the home, it could do with a much neater power adapter. “

Debbie Davies from Pocket Lint reviewed the HP Photosmart 8250 and wrote:

“All in all, this is a very good home printer with the advantage of being versatile, quick and economical. There are a few drawbacks. This is HP’s first fast printer with new printhead technology. As with all firsts, we encountered some glitches in the software that later models will no doubt rectify. It may be worth waiting a few months for HP to introduce even faster models before deciding which printer to buy. Additionally for a device designed for the home, it could do with a much neater power adapter. “

James Galbraith from Macworld reviewed the HP Photosmart 8250 and wrote:

“Though innovative, the Photosmart 8250’s key new features were a little disappointing. Fast speeds and durability were made less impressive by the quality of the printed output. Luckily, by using different available media and higher print settings, we were able to get impressive looking prints. “

M. David Stone from PCMag gave 4 out of 5 rating to HP Photosmart 8250 and wrote:

“Output quality is another strong point. The 8250 earned ratings of good for text, very good for graphics, and at the high end of very good for photos. Most of the test photos qualified as true photo quality, with a sprinkling of decidedly minor flaws. Graphics show banding and some faded-looking fills in default mode, but the only problem worth mentioning in the highest-quality mode is a tendency to lose thin lines. The output is certainly good enough to bring into the office for internal use, and the high-quality output is marginally good enough to use for an important client you want to impress.”

PCMag gave 7.5 out of 10 rating to HP Photosmart 8250 and wrote:

“The good:Economical and fast when using the default settings; robust standalone operation; multiple connectivity options; Mac and Windows compatible. The bad:Grainy prints; large and heavy The bottom line:Speed and economy make the HP Photosmart 8250 a reasonable choice for family photo printing.”

Check out the latest price on HP Photosmart 8250


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1 Comment »

Comment by Bud Woods
2006-01-01 03:35:57

NO matter how long the ink lasts, the final print depends on the ink and paper. I have heard of acid free paper, so
#1 how could they know how long a print would last unless they have a time machine?

Cameras measured in megapixels.. printers measured in dpi
can’t compute
#2 How can we compute what dpi print out = how many megapixels from a camera?
The best resolution printer can not create a picture greater than the resolution of the image it is made from.

mycamel@juno.com

 

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